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Tag Archives: healthy living

There Is Such A Thing As A Beer Belly

Any alcoholic drink can add to the size of your stomach for one very simple reason: Alcohol is dense in calories. Every gram of alcohol contains the same amount of calories as a gram of butter – seven which almost twice as many as a gram of most other carbohydrates or protein. Like other calorie-packed foods. It promotes weight gain.
But there’s also evidence that beer, more than other kinds of alcohol, may cause more fat to settle on your belly. Research at the University of North Carolina at Chap I Hill found that among those who had more than six drinks a week, beer drinkers had the highest waist-to-hip-ratio followed by those who who opted for liquor. Wine drinkers had the slimmest waistlines.



Winter Berry Clafoutis

This simply looks delicious!


  • 4 cups of berries (fresh or frozen, thawed, frozen pre-)
  • 1 tbsp honey,
  • 3/4 cup wheat flour
  • 3/8 cup brown sugar
  • 7/8 cup ground almonds
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 eggs
  • 150ml milk
  • 100ml low-fat cream
  • powdered sugar


  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Warm the honey and pour on berries – set aside.
  3. Mix the flour, almonds, cinnamon and sugar. Separately, whisk whisk eggs, milk and cream. Add liquid ingredients to dry. Stir until smooth.
  4. Baking dish greased with butter, sprinkle with sugar. Put berries, pour batter. Bake for 25-30 minutes. The finished dessert, sprinkle with powdered sugar.
  5. Cool for 15 minutes and serve.


Hummus in 10 Minutes!

Tired of buying Hummus at the stores? (Me too!) So make it yourself in under 10 minutes!


  • 1 16 oz can of chickpeas or garbanzo beans
  • 1/4 cup liquid from can of chickpeas
  • 3-5 tablespoons lemon juice (depending on taste)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons tahini
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil


  1. Drain chickpeas and set aside liquid from can. Combine remaining ingredients in blender or food processor. Add 1/4 cup of liquid from chickpeas. Blend for 3-5 minutes on low until thoroughly mixed and smooth.
  2. Place in serving bowl, and create a shallow well in the center of the hummus.
  3. Add a small amount (1-2 tablespoons) of olive oil in the well. Garnish with parsley (optional).
  4. Serve immediately with fresh, warm or toasted pita bread, or cover and refrigerate.


  1. For a spicier hummus, add a sliced red chile or a dash of cayenne pepper.

Storing Hummus

  1. Hummus can be refrigerated for up to 3 days and can be kept in the freezer for up to one month. Add a little olive oil if it appears to be too dry.


Grilled Chicken Greek Salad

Simple to cook and prepare, this salad offers an explosion of Greek flavor in every bite.


  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice, divided
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic, divided
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • 1 teaspoon pepper, divided
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin, divided
  • 2 boned, skinned chicken breast halves (1 lb. total)
  • 2 tablespoons tahini (sesame paste)
  • 2 cans (15 oz. each) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1/2 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 sliced red bell pepper
  • 1 cup flat-leaf parsley
  • 6 ounces crumbled goat’s-milk feta cheese


  1. Heat grill to high (450° to 550°). Mix 1 tbsp. each lemon juice and oil, 1 tsp. garlic, and 1/2 tsp. each salt, pepper, and cumin in a medium bowl. Add chicken and turn to coat.
  2. Grill chicken, turning once, until cooked through and browned, about 10 minutes. Let rest, covered, 5 minutes.
  3. Whisk together remaining 2 tbsp. each lemon juice and oil, 2 tsp. garlic, 1/2 tsp. each salt and pepper, and 1 tsp. cumin with the tahini in a large bowl. Add chickpeas, tomatoes, onion, and bell pepper and toss to coat. Divide among 4 plates. Slice chicken and set on top. Sprinkle salads with parsley and cheese.
  4. Note: Nutritional analysis is per serving.


Perks of Water

Water: How Much Should You Drink Every Day?
We have all heard it before, you should drink at least 8 cups of water each day. Then to our confusion, we now hear all these other alternatives as to how much water to drink. Tired of not knowing exactly how much H20 you should drink each day? Well look no further, your water questions are answered here and now!

Health benefits of Water
Water is your body’s principal chemical component and makes up about 60 percent of your body weight. Every system in your body depends on water. For example, water flushes toxins out of vital organs, carries nutrients to your cells and provides a moist environment for ear, nose and throat tissues.
Lack of water can lead to dehydration, a condition that occurs when you don’t have enough water in your body to carry out normal functions. Even mild dehydration can drain your energy and make you tired.

How Much Water Do You Need?

Every day you lose water through your breath, perspiration, urine and bowel movements. For your body to function properly, you must replenish its water supply by consuming beverages and foods that contain water.

So how much fluid does the average, healthy adult living in a temperate climate need? The Institute of Medicine determined that an adequate intake (AI) for men is roughly 3 liters (about 13 cups) of total beverages a day. The AI for women is 2.2 liters (about 9 cups) of total beverages a day.

What about the advice to drink eight glasses a day?

Everyone has heard the advice, “drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day.” That’s about 1.9 liters, which isn’t that different from the Institute of Medicine’s recommendation. Although the ‘8 by 8″ rule isn’t supported by hard evidence, it remains popular because it’s easy to remember. Just be sure to keep in mind that the rule should be reframed as, “Drink at least eight 8 ounce glasses of water a day,” because all fluids count towards the daily total.


Olive Oil, The Prime Component of the Mediterranean Diet

Olive oil is the prime component of the Mediterranean Diet. It is the only vegetable oil that can be consumed as it is – freshly pressed from the fruit.

Generally, olive oil is extracted by pressing or crushing olives. There are different varieties of olive oil, depending on the amount of processing involved. Varieties include:

Extra virgin – considered the best, least processed, comprising the oil from the first pressing of the olives.

Virgin – from the second pressing of the olives.

Pure – undergoes some processing, such as filtering and refining. Is made by adding a little extra virgin olive oil to refined olive oil.

Extra light – undergoes considerable processing and only retains a very mild olive flavor.

The less the olive oil is handled, the closer to its natural state, the better the oil.

Olive oil’s health benefits

The beneficial health effects of olive oil are due to both its high content of monounsaturated fatty acids and its high content of antioxidative substances. Olive oil offers protection against heart disease by controlling LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels while raising HDL (the “good” cholesterol) levels. Studies have shown that people who consumed about 2 tablespoons of virgin olive oil daily for 1 week showed less oxidation of LDL cholesterol and higher levels of antioxidant compounds, particularly phenols, in the blood.

Olive oil is very well tolerated by the stomach. In fact, olive oil’s protective function has a beneficial effect on ulcers and gastritis. Including olive oil in your diet may also offer benefits in terms of colon cancer prevention.

5 Foods That Fight Fatigue


If you’ve ever felt very lethargic after a meal, then you’re eating the wrongs foods. Food is supposed to release nutrients that boost your energy, not make you tired. So here are 5 easy-to-digest and rich-in-nutrient foods that will essentially help overcome fatigue due to the stress of our hectic lifestyles.


Why it works: Carbohydrates spend the least amount of time in the stomach, which means you get a quick boost of energy. But unlike processed, sugary cereals, whole oats don’t result in a sugar crash. The high dietary fiber content in oats helps you feel full longer, preventing overeating throughout the day, which can lead to weight gain, sluggishness, and fatigue.


Why it works: Because it’s soft, your body processes yogurt more quickly than a solid food, making it a great source of quick
energy. But while you get a rapid result, it’s also long-lasting, thanks to a good ratio of protein to carbohydrates. Protein stays in the stomach longer than carbohydrates, which translates into a steady source of energy.


Why it works: Iron plays a direct and important role in fighting fatigue. It’s a known energy booster, helping the body produce energy by delivering oxygen to the cells and enabling them to perform optimally. Spinach and other leafy greens offer a high rate of iron for an extremely low caloric intake. Spinach also happens to be an excellent source of vitamin C, which boosts iron absorption.

Nuts and seeds

Why they work: Pumpkin seeds, almonds, cashews, and hazelnuts are all good sources of magnesium, which helps fight muscle fatigue. The tryptophan found in sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, cashews, walnuts, and almonds battles emotional fatigue and promotes sleep, which can ease physical weariness.


Why they work: The protein and high fiber content in beans work together to help balance blood sugar and prevent spikes and dips in energy. The fiber also promotes digestive health, encourages bowel regularity, and helps prevent constipation and weight gain. Thanks to the protein in beans, you get a gradual source of lasting energy.