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Tag Archives: happiness

Green Tea Cheesecake – No Bake


I’ve been on a Green Tea crave recently + tight on time so this recipe sparked quite an interest!

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbsp gelatine powder & 1/4 cup water
  • 6 oz cream cheese, softened
  • 1/3 cup plain yogurt
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1 Tbsp matcha green tea powder and 3 Tbsp warm water, mixed
  • For Crust: 1 package graham crackers crushed into crumbs & 3 Tbsp butter & 1 Tbsp sugar

Preparation:

  1. Mix gelatine powder and water in a small cup and set aside. Combine graham cracker crumbs, melted butter, and sugar in a bowl.
  2. Spread the crumbs in bottom of a 8 inch round cake pan. Flatten the crust, pressing with a spoon. Chill in refrigerator.
  3. Stir softened cream cheese and sugar in a large bowl. Add plain yogurt and heavy cream and mix until smooth. Further, add matcha green tea powder mixture into the filling.
  4. Heat gelatine mixture in the microwave until becomes liquid and add it to the filling. Stir well.
  5. Pour the filling on top of the crust and spread evenly. Refrigerate the cake for 3 hours, or until set.

{About}

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Walking to Reduce Stress


It’s that time of the year again, when everybody is stressing out from a multitude of reasons: tax season for some and finals week for others.  So when you’re in a tense or anger-inducing situation, taking a walk — it can calm your mind and body; walking is a good medicine.
Walking reduces stress in the body in several ways:

  • It helps to eliminate stress hormones (such as adrenaline) from your body.
  • It reduces tension in several large muscle groups — the glutes (buttocks), the quads (front of thighs) and hamstrings (back of thighs).
  • It increases the production of beta-endorphins, which are thought to calm the body and promote restful sleep.

How to enjoy a good walk?

Comfortable and loose fitting clothing is best for a good walk. Always add layers when it seems a little chilly outside.  Use flexible, light weight shoes with a cushioned low heal and roomy toe box for a relaxed, enjoyable walk.

Some do’s and don’ts of walking

  • Walk tall, with your chin up (parallel to the ground) focusing 6 meters ahead.
  • Maintain a moderate pace. Don’t feel that you must walk so fast that you become to breathless to converse normally
  • Don’t over stride or elongate your steps. For extra speed take quicker and shorter steps.
  • Swing arms front to back, with elbow close to the body. Avoid swinging your arms from side to side.
  • Don’t land flat footed. Roll through each steps and push off with your toes.

Don’t feel obliged to carry weights. These throw off natural walking movements and can strain ligaments and tendons.

{RoshanBaskota}

Broiled Chicken with Peppers


Eating healthy is very beneficial but it can also be quite expensive. If you’re looking for a quality meal that’s easy on your wallet, you’ve come to the right place. This meal can serve as a perfect family dinner that will keep your stomach and wallet full.

Estimated Preparation and Cooking Time: 50 Minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 russet potato, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • Kosher salt
  • 8 small skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs (about 2 1/4 pounds)
  • 1 heaping tablespoon dried oregano
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 large green bell pepper, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 6 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 4 to 6 pickled cherry peppers, seeded and sliced, plus 1/3 cup brine
  • 1/4 cup roughly chopped fresh parsley

Directions:

  1. Preheat the broiler. Put the potato in a medium saucepan, cover with water and add 1 tablespoon salt. Bring to a simmer and cook until just tender, about 8 minutes. Drain well.
  2. Meanwhile, pat the chicken dry and sprinkle with the oregano, and salt and pepper to taste. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large cast-iron skillet over high heat. Add the chicken and cook until browned, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer the chicken to a plate.
  3. Add the potato to the skillet and cook, stirring, 3 minutes. Add the onion and bell pepper and cook until slightly soft, about 1 minute. Reduce the heat to medium; add the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and the garlic and cook 2 minutes. Add the cherry peppers and brine and cook, scraping up the pan with a wooden spoon, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat.
  4. Return the chicken to the skillet and sprinkle with the parsley. Toss with tongs, then set the chicken skin-side up on top of the vegetables. Broil until the skin is crisp, 2 to 3 minutes.
  5. Per serving: Calories 611; Fat 42 g (Saturated 10 g); Cholesterol 169 mg; Sodium 243 mg; Carbohydrate 20 g; Fiber 3 g; Protein 38 g

{FoodNetwork}

French Quiche


A French quiche is one of the simplest dishes you can make and good results are nearly guaranteed… Quiche is a savory baked tart or custard filled with meats, cheese, and vegetables, and thickened with eggs. It is always served open face and baked in a pastry crust, and is regarded as the savory equivalent of a custard tart or pie.

Ingredients:

  1. 1 9-inch refrigerated pie crust
  2. 2 tablespoons olive oil
  3. 2 medium onions, chopped
  4. Kosher salt and black pepper
  5. 1 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley, chopped
  6. 4 large eggs
  7. 3/4 cup half-and-half
  8. 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  9. 8 ounces Gruyere, grated
  10. 4 cups mixed greens

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 375° F. Fit the crust into a 9-inch pie plate. Place on a baking sheet.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large skillet over medium-low heat. Add the onions and ½ teaspoon each of salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in the parsley.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, half-and-half, nutmeg, and ¼ teaspoon salt. Stir in the onion mixture and the Gruyère.
  4. Pour the egg mixture into the crust. Bake until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean, 35 to 40 minutes. Let sit for 5 minutes. Drizzle the greens with the remaining tablespoon of oil and sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper. Serve with the quiche.

 

Bing Cherries and Arthritis


It’s a fact that Arthritis is a surfacing  health issue that comes with age. Here is a fruit that poses as an aid for this reoccurring epidemic. Arthritis is a painful and somewhat debilitating condition marked by inflammation, pain and weakness of the joints. While this disease is not reversible, there are steps you can take toward improving the symptoms of arthritis. Simple dietary changes, such as eating more Bing Cherries, may help.

Types of Arthritis
Arthritis is a term used to describe inflammation in the joints, and it can include osteo or rheumatoid arthritis and gout. For osteoarthritis, inflammation occurs as a result of the degeneration of the joint. However, rheumatoid arthritis occurs when your body attacks your own joints; it is an auto-immune disorder. Gout is another type of arthritis triggered by too much uric acid inside your joint.
Blood Markers of Arthritis
Arthritis is a diagnosable condition. If you suspect you have osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or gout, your physician can take a blood sample to look for substances in your blood that indicate an inflammatory response. Uric acid, c-reactive protein and nitric oxide can signify that your body is working to attack inflammation.
Bing Cherries and Arthritis
Bing cherries may be effective in reducing the markers of inflammation associated with the different types of arthritis. A study by the USDA Agriculture Research Service in 2004 analyzed the effects of bing cherries on arthritic inflammation. Ten women were recruited and told to abstain from berries, wine, fruits and vegetables for two days before the study, as these contain antioxidants and contain the potential to alter the result of the study. The day of the study, the subjects were fed a bowl of cherries for breakfast. Then, blood markers of inflammation associated with arthritis were analyzed. The most significant change was in the urate levels, a distinct marker of gout, which decreased significantly throughout the day. Other markers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein and nitric oxide, also were monitored, and also decreased following bing cherry consumption.
Recommendations
Bing cherries seem to reduce inflammation through the work of their antioxidants. These are molecules that neutralize free radicals or other molecules that have become oxidized and damage cells and DNA. Following a diet high in antioxidant-rich foods like cherries, other fruits, vegetables, nuts and tea can ease symptoms of arthritis by reducing inflammation

{LiveStrong}

10 Strange Pineapple Facts


I bet you have never thought about these interesting things when picking out a pineapple at the grocery store or eating one. These are just 10 strange pineapple facts, of course there are plenty more out there!

  1. There are a lot of foods that affect the taste of your seminal or vaginal fluids, but pineapple is one of the strongest. Eating a lot of pineapple makes you taste sweeter, and less ‘fishy’.
  2. When you cut up a pineapple at home, you normally chuck the skin, core and ends in the bin. The pineapple canning industry doesn’t though, these bits are used for making alcohol, vinegar and animal feed.
  3. Each pineapple plant only produces just one pineapple per year.
  4. Unripe pineapples don’t just taste vile, but can actually be quite poisonous. Eating it causes serious throat irritation and it has a strong laxative effect.
  5. Pineapples grow slowly, and can take up to two years to reach full size, so we pick and eat them when they are much smaller, but if they are left to their own devices they can reach up to 9kg (20lbs).
  6. If you want to speed up the ripening of a pineapple, so that you can eat it faster, then you can do it by standing it upside down (on the leafy end).
  7. Traditionally pineapple juice was used as a diuretic and to induce labour.
  8. The Bromelain enzyme in pineapples breaks down proteins. This means that you can use pineapple or pineapple juice as a meat tenderiser.
  9. The same Bromelain enzyme means that you can’t put fresh pineapple in jelly, because it breaks down the gelatine. You can stop this from happening by boiling the chunks of pineapple in their juice or in water for a few minutes, or you can use canned pineapple.
  10. In case you find yourself on a sailing trip in the tropics without any Ajax, you might like to know that pineapple juice mixed with sand is very good for cleaning boat decks and machete blades.

{Johnonfood}

Get Juiced – Green Tornado


Whip up this easy, super refreshing summer cooler using just picked fruits and veggies. With the magical fragrant notes of basil, mint, and tarragon, there is no doubt you will be instantly hooked!

Ingredients:

  • ½ stem tarragon
  • 5 oz. green juice*
  • 2 tsbp fresh lemon juice (½ lemon)
  • 2 tbsp agave nectar
  • Celery for garnish

 Directions:

  1. In a cocktail shaker, muddle tarragon (crush with a wooden spoon – or a bat-shaped tool called a muddler).
  2. Add green juice, lemon juice, and agave. (If you double or triple the recipe, shake in batches of two at a time so as not to overfill cocktail shaker).
  3. Strain into a highball glass filled with ice. Garnish with celery.

  *Green Juice

Ingredients:

  • 2 leaves parsley
  • 2 leaves Boston lettuce
  • 6 leaves spinach
  • 1 sprig mint
  • 4 leaves basil
  • 3 oz. water

 Directions:

  1.  In a blender, liquefy ingredients; strain with a fine mesh strainer (use a spoon to push through).

{InStyle, July. 192}